mushrooms

  • Just Raw: Keeping it Simple

    The holidays tend to leave many people frazzled. Lots of family means lots of food, which always leads to lots of hassle. But if you choose to make a few raw appetizers, your work load will be lightened the day of, and your guests will never know the difference.

  • Wild Mushroom Risotto

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    Wild Mushroom Mixture

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 cup sliced shiitake mushrooms

    1 cup sliced oyster mushrooms

    1 cup sliced maitake mushrooms

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    Risotto

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1 1/2 cups Arborio rice

    1/2 cup white wine

    5 cups water or low-sodium vegetable stock

    3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

    2 teaspoons salt

    1/2 teaspoon black pepper

    In a large pot or sauté pan, heat the oil for the mushroom mixture over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, mushrooms, and thyme and sauté to soften, five to eight minutes. Season with the salt and black pepper, transfer to a bowl, and reserve. To the same pot, over medium heat, add the oil for the risotto. Add the onion, garlic, and thyme and cook until soft, about three minutes. Add the rice and toast for two minutes. Pour in the wine and cook one minute, scraping any browned bits off the bottom of the pot. Add two cups of the water or stock and turn the heat to high. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat back to medium. Allow the risotto to simmer, stirring every two minutes, until the liquid reduces by half. Add two more cups of water or stock and repeat. Add the remaining one cup of water or stock and stir frequently until most of the liquid has been absorbed by the rice but the rice is still loose. Add the wild mushroom mixture back to the pot, stir in the nutritional yeast, and season with the salt and black pepper. Serve immediately. Source: The Vegucation of Robin by Robin Quivers

  • Medicinal Mushrooms

    Medicinal mushrooms have an uncanny “intelligence” within the body, seeming to sense areas that are toxic, stressed, injured, or damaged and focus their healing potency where it is needed most. Certain species of mushrooms have been used medicinally for thousands of years. Today there are over 270 different varieties with scientifically documented healing properties.

    An introduction to nature’s smartest healers
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
  • Quick and Easy Pea Pods

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    1 1/2 pounds pea pods, trimmed

    1 large summer squash, peeled and thinly sliced

    1 1/2 cups cremini or white mushrooms, sliced

    3 tablespoons olive oil

    3/4 teaspoon garlic salt

    1/4 teaspoon pepper

    Coat bottom of large skillet with olive oil and heat to medium. Add pea pods, mushrooms, and squash. Sauté until vegetables are slightly soft.

  • Sautéed Mushrooms with Herbs

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    Ingredients:

    ½ pound mushrooms

    1 tablespoon vegetable oil

    2 tablespoons butter

    1 shallot

    1 to 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

    1 tablespoon chopped tarragon or chives

    Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

    Heat oil, butter in skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms, salt, and pepper. Sauté for 3 minutes. Raise heat to high and sauté for 2 additional minutes. When liquid has almost evaporated, add shallots and sauté for 1 to 2 more minutes. Add parsley and tarragon or chives. Season to taste.

  • Focus On: Mushrooms


    What are they? Mushrooms are the spore-bearing fruits of a fungus. They are not categorized as a plant because they do not undergo photosynthesis, yet they still boast nutritional benefits of their own. They can be found in virtually any habitat, especially where it is warm and wet.
     
    [ Benefits ]

  • Fabulous Fungi

    Grow up in a household where Mom used mushrooms only one way, if at all—chopping up the white, button variety and tossing the bits into a casserole? It’s time to branch out if you haven’t already.

    Mushrooms work like magic when it comes to warding off disease.
    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Magic Mushrooms

    Unlike the kind you heard about in college, the chemicals in these ’shrooms won’t give you special powers—or get you arrested for that matter—but they are creating quite a buzz. Developed in Japan in the mid 1980s, active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is produced from the fermented extract of a hybrid of several medicinal mushrooms.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Fungi For Your Face

    You might think of fungus as the last thing to benefit your complexion, but a growing body of research suggests mushrooms may soon play a starring role in luxe skincare products. Keep an eye out for lotions and potions infused with these skin-saving ’shrooms.

    By Josie Garthwaite